P is for Pansy

pansies

Perhaps the amateur who only knows the Pansy as a garden flower is a little startled when he first sees a stand of prize flowers at a show. . .though much larger, rounder, thicker and more beautifully coloured than any Pansies that he has ever seen before, they will have the same bright, winning, affectionate faces.

The text is from Popular Garden Flowers, by Walter Page Wright (1911). Click here to read the book online, or to download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

O is for Orchid

orchid

Orchids are plants that thrive and grow robust on the air and the moisture it contains, therefore it is absolutely necessary that they should have as much air as possible without causing a draft.

The text is from a book called Amateur Orchid Cultivator’s Guide Book, by H.A. Burberry, 1899. Click here to read the book online or download it for free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

N is for Nasturtium

nasturtium

Don’t you just love the time of nasturtiums? their purple scent and their colours? They seem to penetrate and glow through everything, and make the time their own.

The quote is by Sarah Grand, from a book called Nasturtiums Bright and Gay, by Bessie Gray, 1897. Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

L is for Leaves

leaves

Birch foliage does not offer a great variety of tints as a contribution to the splendours of autumnal colours, but the motion of its pretty little glossy leaves which are always ‘twinkling’ in the sunshine, adds life and intensity to their hue.

The text is from Autumnal Leaves by Francis George Heath, published in 1885.  Click here to read the book online or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012