Z is for Zinnia

zinnia

Zinnias when well grown are charming plants for the flower garden, in groups by themselves or massed with other plants. They like a rich loamy soil and sunny situation. Being mostly annuals they must be raised from seeds every year.

The text is from A Practical Guide to Garden Plants, by John Weathers (1901).  Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

Y is for Yarrow

yarrow

Yarrow is a common weed, whose gray-white flower heads are utterly unattractive even to those who profess to be fond of flowers. But, before passing the weed in disdain, it will be worth our while to pick up a small piece and place it under the glass for closer inspection. Ah! What a change!–the uninteresting weed at once assumes an attractive look.

The text is from Familiar Flowers of Field and Garden, by F. Schuyler Mathews (1896).  Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

X is for Xanthium

xanthium

The unique character of the foliage stamps this species as most interesting. The leaves. . .give the species an appearance in the field unlike that of any other North American species.

The text is from New Species of Xanthium and Solidago, by Charles Frederick Millspaugh, (1918).  Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

W is for Water Lily

water lily

Water-lilies are essentially flowers for the man or woman who revels in magnificent colours, for the hues are not equalled in variety or brilliancy by the flowers of any other plants.

The text is from Water-Lilies and How to Grow Them, by Henry S. Conrad and Henri Hus (1907).  Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012

U is for Urn

urn

The flowers, gathered when full grown, and dried in the shade, will presesrve their beauty for years, particularly if they are not exposed to the sun. A friend of the writer’s possesses some Amaranths, both purple and yellow, which he has had by him for several years, enclosed with some locks of hair in a little marble urn. They look as vivid as if they were put in yesterday.

The text is from Flora Domstica or The Portable Flower Garden, with Directions for the Treatment of Plants in Pots (1825).  Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2012