G is for Grasshopper

grasshopper

One of the long-horned grasshoppers, known as sciuideria augustifolia, is noisier by night than by day. The day tune is played only in the sunshine, and the night tune after dark or in cloudy weather.

The text is from The Insect Book, by Leland O. Howard, (1903). Click here to read the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

F is for Firefly

firefly

From start to finish, the Glow-worm’s life is one great orgy of light. The eggs are luminous; the grubs likewise. The full-grown females are magnificent light-houses, the adult males retain the glimmer which the grubs already possessed.

The text is from The Glow-Worm and other Beetles, by J. Henri Fabre, translated by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos, (1919). Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

E is for Earwig

earwig

 

The female earwig deposits her eggs under a stone in some cavity in the ground often dug out by her own labour. Unlike most other insects, the female does not perish as soon as she had laid her eggs, but lives to behold her offspring, brooding over them almost like a hen.

Bath, W. Harcourt. The text is from The Young Collector’s Handbook of Ants, Bees, Dragon-flies, Earwigs, Crickets and Flies, by W. Harcourt Bath, (1890.)  Click here to browse the book or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013