K is for Katydid and L is for Ladybug

katydid-ladybug

The katydid is a frequent singer on the highway in the evening hours. He looks like a large green grasshopper, but he has larger wings, which are leaflike and delicately veined; his antennae are much longer than his body, and his slender, long legs give him a peculiarly distinguished appearance.

The katydid text is from the book Familiar Features of the Roadside: The Flowers, Shrubs, Birds and Insects, by F. Schulyer Mathews, (1897).  Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

On the whole lady beetles are of great benefit to plant growers because they feed upon and destroy many noxious insects. . .Many persons do not recognize them as friends. They should not be destroyed.

The ladybug text is from the book Some Common Lady Beetles of Connecticut, by Wilton Everett Britton, (1914). Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

I is for Io Moth

io-moth

The Io-moth…is the most common of the smaller species of the family…The larva is one that the student should learn to recognize in order that he may avoid handling it, for it is armed with spines the prick of which is venomous.

The text is from Insect Life: An Introduction to Nature-Study, by John Henry Comstock, (1908).  Click here to browse the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

To learn more about io moths and their stinging larvae, click here.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013