R is for Regal Walnut Moth

royal-walnut-moth

Nearly all caterpillars, however formidable they may look, are in fact harmless. The fiercest one I have ever seen, that of the regal walnut moth (Ceratocampa regalis) is very large, and with horny spines stretched over the head, which when disturbed he shakes in a threatening manner, is said to be perfectly harmless.

The text is from the book Among the Moths and Butterflies, by Julia P. Ballard, (1890). Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge, 2103

 

Q is for Queen of Spain Fritillary

queen-of-spain

Although abundant in all the middle and Southern countries of Europe, this butterfly is among the rarest inhabiting Britain. It is sometimes not seen for many successive seasons, while in others specimens have been procured in several places.

The text is from British Butterflies, by James Duncan (1855). Click here to read it online or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge, 2013

P is for Potato Bug

potato-beetle

It was away back before my readers were born, somewhere around 1855 or 1859, that the potato-bugs began to attract attention by attacking the neighboring fields and working eastward. . . They had nineteen years of riotous living before they reached the Atlantic Coast.

The text is from The American Boys’ Book of Bugs, Butterflies and Beetles, by Dan Beard, (1915).  Click here to read it online or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

O is for Owl Moth

owl-moth

Certain species of Moths. . .(such as the Atlas Moth of the east, or the Great Owl Moth of Brazil) sometimes measure nearly a foot across the wings!

The text is from British Butterflies, by James Duncan, in the Entomology series from The Naturalist’s Library, edited by Sir William Jardine, (1855). Click here to read the book online, or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

N is for No-See-Um

no-see-um

The flies are commonly known as “Sand-Flies”…and on account of their voracious habits and the fact that their small size enables them to creep through the meshes of an ordinary mosquito net, they are a source of much annoyance…especially as their bite causes great local irritation.

The text is from the book Flies in Relation to Disease : Bloodsucking Flies, by Edward Hindle, (1914). Click here to read it online, or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

April Fool!