V is for Viceroy Butterfly

viceroy-butterfly

The Viceroy is commonly supposed to have no objectionable taste when eaten by birds, but it so closely resmbles the Monarch in its color pattern and its habits of flight that it has been assumed that birds would not touch it because of its resemblance to the distasteful butterfly.

The text is from the book Butterflies Worth Knowing, by Clarence M. Weed, (1917). Click here to read it online or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge, 2013

U is for Underwing Moth

underwing-moth

The novelty of the first underwing moth (Catocala Amatrix) has passed away . . . These fine moths during the day sit on the trunks of trees, and are scarcely distinguishable from the bark thereof, as their grey lichen-looking upper wings entirely conceal the splendor of the scarlet, or yellow under wings.

The text is from the book Butterflies and Moths of North America, by Herman Strecker, (1878).  Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive. 

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge, 2013

T is for Termite

termites

The military condition. . .is most perfectly developed among the so-called white ants, or Termites, living in Africa, Southern Asia, South America, and Australia; . . .above and below the royal cell are the rooms of the workers and soldiers which are specially charged with the care and defence of the royal pair.

The text is from the book Mind in Animals, by Ludwig Buchner, (1880). Click here to read it online or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge, 2013

S is for Seventeen-Year Cicada

seventeen-year-cicada

The most remarkable fact about this insect is that, while so far as we know the other species of Cicada pass but two or three years in attaining the winged, adult state, the present one lives under ground over sixteen years, assuming towards the end of the seventeenth the winged state.

The text is from the book Half Hours with Insects, by A.S. Packard, (1881). Click here to read it online or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge, 2013