M is for Mobile Home

mobile-home

Modern mobile homes are much larger and more luxurious than those of fifteen years ago. They may be 35, 40, 45–even 50–feet in length. Some come in two sections. Most of them are equipped with complete bathroom facilities, plush living-rooms, up-to-date kitchens, and full-size bedrooms.

The text is from the book How to Build and Operate a Mobile-Home Park, by Leno Ceno Michelon, (1955). Click here to read the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

L is for Lighthouse

lighthouse

The situation of the Carn Bras is lonely in the extreme, but, so far as care and forethought can make it so, residence there is really comfortable. Besides the lantern, the lighthouse consists of three stories–the lowest for coals, water, provisions, and stores; on the second is the living room and kitchen, and the third is the keepers’ sleeping apartment.

The text is from the book Lighthouses: Their History and Romance, by William John Hardy, (1895). Click here to read the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

K is for Kitchen

kitchen

In order to determine recommended dimensions for kitchen units…a series of tests was conducted at the housing research laboratory…using 26 women volunteers, all of them confined to wheelchairs.

The text is from the book Space and Design Requirements for Wheelchair Kitchens, by Helen E. McCullough and Mary B. Farnham, (1960). Click here to read the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

J is for Junk

junk

The Chinese junk Keying, owned by an English sea captain, was sailed to New York by a Chinese crew in 1847. In the New York City Museum, there is a large painting of the Keying, riding at anchor in New York Harbor, where she was a nine days wonder.

The text is from the book The Romance of China: Excursions to China in U.S. Culture, by John R. Haddad, 2005.  Click here to read the book online from Project Gutenberg.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013