H is for Honeycomb

honeycomb quilt

The second quilt. . .is a most enchanting example of honeycomb patchwork. It is said to have been made in the early 19th century by the wife of a British sea captain stationed in the Barbados.

The text is from page 19 of the Bulletin of the Royal Ontario Museum of Archaeology, volume 18, 1923, and the artwork is loosely based on Figure 17 in that publication. Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013

G is for Goose-Chase

goose-chase quilt

The counterpanes and comforters were quilted in wonderful patterns. There was the “wild-goose chase,” the “log cabin”. . .and a “charm quilt,” in twelve hundred pieces, no two of which were alike.

The text is from page 113 of the book Half-a-Dozen Housekeepers: A Story for Girls in Half-a-Dozen Chapters, by Kate Douglas Wiggin, 1942. Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013