P is for Pinwheel

pinwheel-quilt

 

During the long winter evenings they broke the monotony with knitting bees and quilting bees, and making braided and hooked rugs. Some of their quilt patterns are beautifully finished, usually the well-known patterns such as Grandmother’s Flower Garden and the Pinwheel.

The text is from page 125-6 of Pine, Potatoes and People: The Story of Aroostook, by Helen Hamlin, 1948. Click here to read the book online, or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014

O is for Ocean Waves

ocean-waves-quilt

Names of a nautical turn are to be expected for quilts which originate in seaside cottages and seaport villages. “Bounding Betty,” “Ocean Waves” and “Storm at Sea” have a flavour as salty as the spray which dampens them when they are spread out to sun by the sandy shore.

The text is from page 120 of Quilts: Their Story And How To Make Them, by Marie D. Webster, 1915. Click here to read the book online, or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014

M is for Measuring & N is for Needle

measure-and-needle

 

Some Welsh quilters use no templates and mark the pattern merely with. . .tailor’s chalk, string, a ruler, needles and thread and pins. Measurements and chalk marks, tacking threads, needle-marks and perhaps a few pins stuck upright, are the only guide they need for sewing quite a complicated pattern.

The text is from Traditional Quilting: Its Story And Its Practice, by Mavis Fitzrandolph, 1954. Click here to read the book online, or download it free from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2013