Z is for ZigZag

zigzag-quilt

 

. . . if the quilt is worked from both sides of the frame there is a danger that it may be cockled in the middle of the strip worked on. Therefore many good quilters will say that they never allow workers to sit on both sides of the frame and some even run a tacking thread zigzag over the quilt when several are working together, to make sure the three layers are kept in place.

The text is from Traditional Quilting : Its Story and its Practice, by Mavis Fitzrandolph, London : B.T. Batsford Ltd., 1954, page 62. Click here to read the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014

W is for Whig Rose

whig-rose-quilt Mrs. Myrtle Mallette presented a fine cotton quilt appliqued in ”Whig Rose” pattern and quilted in “Princess Feather” and diagonal lines with the appliqued work outlined in quilting, which shows effectively on the plain reverse side.

The text is from the Report on the Progress and Condition of the United States National Museum, 1907. Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014

V is for Variable Star

variable-star

Works in the Exhibition [include] Variable Star with central medallion motif, c 1840-60, Eastern United States. . .Sun Medallion with Variable Star crib quilt c 1850-70, found in Ohio.

The text is from Two Hundred Years of American Quilts [exhibition catalogue] from the Collection of Edwin Binney, 3rd & Gail Binney-Winslow. Click here to read it online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014

 

U is for Union Star

union-star

The union star quilt is made of 3 colours, red, white and blue. The centre pieces and points are white, the pieces to fill between the joints are blue, and the corner pieces red.

The text is from Scammell’s Universal Treasure-house of Useful Knowledge: An Encyclopedia of Valuable Receipts in the Principal Arts of Life etc, 1889.  Click here to read it online, or download it free, from Google E-books.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014

T is for Tulip Quilt

tulip-quilt

The last “lap” of the tulip quilt was turned over as the fading sun lit up the west window of the “best room,” and long shadows played over the porch. They took the quilt out of the frames, then, unrolled it and spread it out on the floor for inspection.

The text is from page 129 of Little Amish Schoolhouse, by Ella Maie Seyfert, 1939. Click here to read the book online, or download it free, from the Internet Archive.

artwork by Joanne Stanbridge 2014